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September 20-22, 2022
Edmonton Convention Centre
Alberta, Canada

Co-Hosts
  • 11 30 AM

Opportunities in Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

The CCS Knowledge Bar

Post-combustion carbon capture may be the most technically feasible and economical means of reducing the carbon intensity of existing commercial industries, given that it does not require significa...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
tuesday September 20, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Opportunities in Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

Post-combustion carbon capture may be the most technically feasible and economical means of reducing the carbon intensity of existing commercial industries, given that it does not require significant production outages or replacement/major overhaul of existing assets. Post-combustion carbon capture does however present unique engineering challenges including low CO2 partial pressures, contaminants in the flue gas, and significant infrastructure/plot allocation to support capture facilities. Recent industry scale-ups have been challenged to achieve reliable performance due to solvent degradation, poor performance, and the rising costs of operations. Industrial applications for post-combustion carbon capture will be discussed with a focus on opportunities to address the challenges outlined above. The presentation will leverage information from Fluor's extensive experience in design, build and operation of carbon capture facilities with a focus on innovations in Fluor's Econamine FG+TM post-combustion capture technology.

Matthew Gutscher 300x300
Matthew Gutscher Principal Process Engineer Fluor
  • 12 30 PM

Closing the Carbon Circle: From Waste to Energy to CCS

The CCS Knowledge Bar

Varme Energy is the first company in Canada developing Waste to Energy with CCS projects at a commercial scale. Our solution involves a commercialized dual combustion Advanced Thermal Technology th...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm12:30 PM - 1:15 PM
tuesday September 20, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Closing the Carbon Circle: From Waste to Energy to CCS

  • pr-alarm12:30 PM - 1:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

Varme Energy is the first company in Canada developing Waste to Energy with CCS projects at a commercial scale. Our solution involves a commercialized dual combustion Advanced Thermal Technology that gasifies waste to produce superheated steam. When integrated with carbon capture and storage this process reduces the GHG emissions from municipal solid waste by ~97%. Our projects range from 100,000-200,000 tonnes of waste input and produce approximately 1:1 tonnes CO2 per tonne of waste.

Sean Collins
Sean Collins CEO Varme Energy
  • 1 30 PM

Bad Clips Sink Ships: Public Engagement on CCUS

The CCS Knowledge Bar

The Petroleum Technology Research Centre has been at the centre of project planning for two of the earliest and largest CCUS projects in the world. Between 2000 and 2015 PTRC manages the IEAGHG Wey...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
tuesday September 20, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Bad Clips Sink Ships: Public Engagement on CCUS

  • pr-alarm1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

The Petroleum Technology Research Centre has been at the centre of project planning for two of the earliest and largest CCUS projects in the world. Between 2000 and 2015 PTRC manages the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, a project that examined and validated the ability to store and CO2 in two depleted oilfields in southeastern Saskatchewan. After 15 years, hundreds of refereed papers, and three major publications, the research component of that project came to an end and Weyburn-Midale oilfields continue to inject about 8000 tonnes of new CO2 per day, with accumulated totals of more than 41 Mt in the two reservoirs. In 2012, PTRC drilled an injection and observation well 3 km from SaskPower’s Boundary Dam CCS Facility, then in development, and by 2014 began to inject CO2 for permanent storage in a deep saline aquifer (the Deadwood Formation) 3.2 km underground. That field site is now the largest field laboratory in the world for the examination of different measurement, monitoring and verification technologies in relation to the deep geological storage of CO2. Public outreach and communications has played a major role in both these projects. If there is any lesson to learn for those planning CCUS operation, pubic consultation and effective tools for that consultation must be developed early and arise out of any risk assessment done during the project plan. PTRC has had intimate knowledge of effective CCS communications, having dealt both the planning of these two projects and the crisis communications that arose out of a leak allegation that hit the Weyburn project in 2011. This presentation will discuss the effective tools and strategies that need to exist to assure projects happen in the real world.

Norm Sacuta 300x300
Norm Sacuta Director of Communications Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC)
  • 2 30 PM

Chemical Looping Process for CO2 Conversion to Elemental Carbon

The CCS Knowledge Bar

InnoTech Alberta has developed a chemical looping process for converting CO2 to elemental carbon such as graphite and carbon nano horn. In this concept, the CO2 is reduced to elemental carbon using...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
tuesday September 20, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Chemical Looping Process for CO2 Conversion to Elemental Carbon

  • pr-alarm2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

InnoTech Alberta has developed a chemical looping process for converting CO2 to elemental carbon such as graphite and carbon nano horn. In this concept, the CO2 is reduced to elemental carbon using a catalytic reagent which later in the process is regenerated for circulation in the loop. The catalytic reagent is introduced in solid form to the reactor, reacting with the CO2 in an exothermic reaction. This reaction releases energy. This energy will be harvested to be used for the reagent regeneration step. The elemental carbon and the oxidized reagent are removed from the reactor in solid form. Two approaches have been taken for the regeneration of the catalytic reagent: a) electrolysis process (commercially available), and b) plasma-based regeneration. Electrolysis process: In this process, the reactor output products are washed with hydrochloric acid to remove the oxidized reagent from the carbon product. The oxidized reagent dissolves in the hydrochloric acid and creates a reagent chloride. The carbon product is afterwards rinsed with water and sent to the lab for characterization. The reagent chloride, on other hand, is introduced into the molten medium electrolysis to separate the pure catalytic reagent from the chlorine gas. The regenerated catalyst is then sent back to the beginning of the process. The regeneration step is endothermic. In order to make this process sustainable, it is envisioned to recover the heat from the front end of the process and use it for the catalyst regeneration. Plasma-based regeneration: InnoTech Alberta is developing alternative energy-efficient options for the regeneration of the catalyst using the microwave or thermal plasma processes. In this approach, the catalyst oxide and elemental carbon are physically separated from each other. The catalyst oxide powder is carried into the plasma reactor using methane as carrier gas and reducing agent. The outlet products of the plasma reactor are CO and hydrogen or syngas, which can be used for producing different products.

Aref Najafi 300x300
Aref Najafi Manager, Carbon Capture and Conversion Innotech Alberta
  • 3 15 PM
Break
  • 4 00 PM

Industry Networking Reception

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
tuesday September 20, 2022

Industry Networking Reception

  • pr-alarm4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor
  • 11 30 AM

Compact Modular Membrane Contactor for Carbon Capture

The CCS Knowledge Bar

If we want to meet the global goal of 50% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050 a combination of many technologies will be needed. For the ongoing energy transition phase, renewables are not enough...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
wednesday September 21, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Compact Modular Membrane Contactor for Carbon Capture

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

If we want to meet the global goal of 50% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050 a combination of many technologies will be needed. For the ongoing energy transition phase, renewables are not enough and unpractical in many applications such as the marine industry and other difficult to decarbonize industries. With carbon emissions reduction and energy transition being a priority of many countries, the petroleum industry is uniquely positioned with the needed industrial skills and talents to be the first adopters of carbon capture and to pursue net zero emission from fossil fuel production and use. Ionada is the first to offer a solution that can be applied upstream, mid-stream as well as downstream oil and gas industry. Ionada’s modular membrane contactor, which is deployed in days instead of years can capture and reduce CO2 from both point source emission and directly from the air. This will help transition to new carbon negative fuels and remove the excess CO2 from the environments through direct air capture, thereby helping to achieve the 50% worldwide reduction goal. The membrane system consists of a porous membrane which allows the gas stream to penetrate and react with an absorption solvent which is circulated on the other side of the membrane. The high available surface area separation in Ionada`s patented hollow fiber membrane contactor reactors (HFMCR) increase capture efficiency and reduces absorbent losses while the membrane extractors offer much lower energy requirements. Thus, the membrane technology reduces the cost of carbon capture by at least 30% when compared to traditional technologies like packed bed and steam stripping columns. It also allows the independent manipulation of gas speeds, liquid temperatures, and pressures whiles eliminating the issue of flooding, entrainment, or foaming

Edoardo Panziera 300x300
Edoardo Panziera Managing Director IONADA
  • 12 30 PM

Boosting the Efficiency of CO2 Conversion Systems using Gas-Capturing Surfaces

The CCS Knowledge Bar

Electrocatalytic conversion of CO2 is a promising approach towards reducing the ever-growing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere and generating valuable fuel products such as ethylene and ethanol. A fu...

  • locationExhibition Floor
  • small-arm12:30 PM - 1:15 PM
wednesday September 21, 2022
The CCS Knowledge Bar

Boosting the Efficiency of CO2 Conversion Systems using Gas-Capturing Surfaces

  • pr-alarm12:30 PM - 1:15 PM
  • pr-locationExhibition Floor

Electrocatalytic conversion of CO2 is a promising approach towards reducing the ever-growing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere and generating valuable fuel products such as ethylene and ethanol. A fundamental challenge in performing this reaction is the limited solubility of CO2 in aqueous electrolytes which can increase co-evolution of hydrogen and reduce the selectivity to fuel products over time. This CO2 solubility limitation is an important bottleneck that needs to be overcome in order to maximize energy-efficient scale-up of this conversion process. In this talk I will introduce specialized gas-attracting surfaces which when placed in close proximity to a CO2 conversion catalyst increases local CO2 concentration close to the catalyst. This surface is a micro-textured superhydrophobic material that repels water but allows a smooth layer of gas called a plastron to stay close along its surface and thereby results in local supersaturation of CO2. By using this surface in close proximity to a copper catalyst, the competing hydrogen co-evolution reaction is suppressed and CO2 conversion rate is doubled, thereby generating attractive products such as ethylene, propanol and ethanol, as well as acetone and acetate which have not been reported previously.

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Sami Khan Simon Fraser University